Marijuana-Infused Tea

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Marijuana-Infused Tea

How to Make and Use Marijuana Flour

09-19-2017

marijuana flour

You go to your local dispensary and check out the edibles — so many goodies! If you’re the frugal type, you might find some of them too expensive and opt for traditional weed instead. Or, you might feel inspired to make your own.
Then, you wonder — how do you make homemade edibles without large chunks of weed in them? Somehow, the edible bakers manage to make them taste more… Read more

The Connecticut Hospice and Medical Marijuana

09-15-2017

ct hospice marijuana

The United States has a severe opioid problem and many of the addictions begin in medical care. When a patient experiences severe pain, a doctor will sometimes prescribe opioids to relieve their symptoms. This can act as a slippery slope — one in three painkiller patients become dependent or addicted.
This addiction can be a devastating one. We desperately need to find an alternate,… Read more

All About Medicinal Cannabis Oil

09-14-2017

cannabis oil

When reading about the benefits of medical marijuana and testimonies from patients, you may have seen something about cannabis oil, or CBD oil. Like other marijuana products, cannabis oil is starting to grow in popularity as the stigma against marijuana reduces.
As an informed patient, you may wonder if cannabis oil could work for you. After all, it has so many glowing testimonies out there…. Read more

Convection vs. Conduction Vaporizers

09-11-2017

convection vs conduction vaporizers

Inhaling cannabis lets you get relief quickly, but the most popular inhalation method, smoking, isn’t exactly the healthiest way to consume medical marijuana. So what do you do if you need the fastest alleviation of your symptoms with fewer health risks? Vaping works as a healthier alternative to smoking due to the much lower amount of toxins you take in.
To vape marijuana, you need to… Read more

Breathalyzers for Detecting Marijuana

09-05-2017

marijuana breathalyzers

You’ve seen it on the cop shows. Someone’s driving under the influence, so the officer pulls out a breathalyzer and finds the driver has alcohol in their system. Alcohol can seriously impair your ability to drive, not to mention driving drunk is illegal.
But, what about marijuana? While the police currently don’t have a way to check for the marijuana in your system on the… Read more

Cannabis-Infused Soap

08-29-2017

marijuana soap

Cannabis is a natural ingredient that can be added to many types of products. There are several ways to consume medical marijuana — most typically it’s ingested through the lungs or stomach. However, marijuana can also be useful as a topical product and has some health benefits when applied to the skin. Adding it to soap can make those health benefits more easily accessible by… Read more

Marijuana Training Program for Doctors in MA

08-25-2017

ma marijuana doctors

The medical marijuana program in Massachusetts requires doctors to register with the state before recommending marijuana therapy to their patients. For most medical practitioners, medical training is ongoing throughout their career. Training in the use of medical marijuana can be difficult to obtain because of the restrictions under federal law. The Massachusetts Medical Society now offers an… Read more

Can You Donate Blood While Taking Medical Marijuana?

08-24-2017

marijuana-donate-blood

Donating blood is a volunteer activity that many people take very seriously. Donated blood is used for many medical procedures, especially emergencies. The blood you donate could save a life, as the American Red Cross reminds us periodically when blood supplies are low.
If you’ve ever donated blood, you know there’s a screening process to qualify you for donation. There are a… Read more

Medical Marijuana and Work Drug Tests

08-22-2017

marijuana work drug test

Although people in the U.S. are welcoming the new medical marijuana laws, there is still uncertainty among employers and employees alike on how to handle using it legally in the workplace. As an employee using medical cannabis or considering getting a recommendation for it, you may have questions about the work drug test in your workplace and the adverse implications of positive test… Read more

Marijuana Aromatherapy

08-21-2017

marijuana aromatherapy

The aroma, and flavor, in most foods is a result of the naturally occurring oils in the food. Coffee has a strong aroma, while the smell of a fresh avocado is particularly faint. The cannabis plant also contains oils that produce a distinct smell. There are more than 200 terpenes, or essential oils, produced in the cannabis plant, each adding a different note to the aroma.
Different parts of… Read more

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 26 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

What Is Hash?

Sm3DBF.jpg

What Is Hash?

How to Make and Use Marijuana Flour

09-19-2017

marijuana flour

You go to your local dispensary and check out the edibles — so many goodies! If you’re the frugal type, you might find some of them too expensive and opt for traditional weed instead. Or, you might feel inspired to make your own.
Then, you wonder — how do you make homemade edibles without large chunks of weed in them? Somehow, the edible bakers manage to make them taste more… Read more

The Connecticut Hospice and Medical Marijuana

09-15-2017

ct hospice marijuana

The United States has a severe opioid problem and many of the addictions begin in medical care. When a patient experiences severe pain, a doctor will sometimes prescribe opioids to relieve their symptoms. This can act as a slippery slope — one in three painkiller patients become dependent or addicted.
This addiction can be a devastating one. We desperately need to find an alternate,… Read more

All About Medicinal Cannabis Oil

09-14-2017

cannabis oil

When reading about the benefits of medical marijuana and testimonies from patients, you may have seen something about cannabis oil, or CBD oil. Like other marijuana products, cannabis oil is starting to grow in popularity as the stigma against marijuana reduces.
As an informed patient, you may wonder if cannabis oil could work for you. After all, it has so many glowing testimonies out there…. Read more

Convection vs. Conduction Vaporizers

09-11-2017

convection vs conduction vaporizers

Inhaling cannabis lets you get relief quickly, but the most popular inhalation method, smoking, isn’t exactly the healthiest way to consume medical marijuana. So what do you do if you need the fastest alleviation of your symptoms with fewer health risks? Vaping works as a healthier alternative to smoking due to the much lower amount of toxins you take in.
To vape marijuana, you need to… Read more

Breathalyzers for Detecting Marijuana

09-05-2017

marijuana breathalyzers

You’ve seen it on the cop shows. Someone’s driving under the influence, so the officer pulls out a breathalyzer and finds the driver has alcohol in their system. Alcohol can seriously impair your ability to drive, not to mention driving drunk is illegal.
But, what about marijuana? While the police currently don’t have a way to check for the marijuana in your system on the… Read more

Cannabis-Infused Soap

08-29-2017

marijuana soap

Cannabis is a natural ingredient that can be added to many types of products. There are several ways to consume medical marijuana — most typically it’s ingested through the lungs or stomach. However, marijuana can also be useful as a topical product and has some health benefits when applied to the skin. Adding it to soap can make those health benefits more easily accessible by… Read more

Marijuana Training Program for Doctors in MA

08-25-2017

ma marijuana doctors

The medical marijuana program in Massachusetts requires doctors to register with the state before recommending marijuana therapy to their patients. For most medical practitioners, medical training is ongoing throughout their career. Training in the use of medical marijuana can be difficult to obtain because of the restrictions under federal law. The Massachusetts Medical Society now offers an… Read more

Can You Donate Blood While Taking Medical Marijuana?

08-24-2017

marijuana-donate-blood

Donating blood is a volunteer activity that many people take very seriously. Donated blood is used for many medical procedures, especially emergencies. The blood you donate could save a life, as the American Red Cross reminds us periodically when blood supplies are low.
If you’ve ever donated blood, you know there’s a screening process to qualify you for donation. There are a… Read more

Medical Marijuana and Work Drug Tests

08-22-2017

marijuana work drug test

Although people in the U.S. are welcoming the new medical marijuana laws, there is still uncertainty among employers and employees alike on how to handle using it legally in the workplace. As an employee using medical cannabis or considering getting a recommendation for it, you may have questions about the work drug test in your workplace and the adverse implications of positive test… Read more

Marijuana Aromatherapy

08-21-2017

marijuana aromatherapy

The aroma, and flavor, in most foods is a result of the naturally occurring oils in the food. Coffee has a strong aroma, while the smell of a fresh avocado is particularly faint. The cannabis plant also contains oils that produce a distinct smell. There are more than 200 terpenes, or essential oils, produced in the cannabis plant, each adding a different note to the aroma.
Different parts of… Read more

(Why?)

Published at Thu, 28 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

Groove Grinder From Aerospace (Review)

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Groove Grinder From Aerospace (Review)

Mrs. Nice Guy

There are endless options of grinders on the market, so how do you decide which is worth your money?

That’s where I come in…because I just received a Groove Grinder from Aerospace. This 4 piece, 63mm CNC Groove Grinder comes with a magnetic lid, kief catcher/sifter, and a guitar pick scraper with double-lead threading.

I currently have two grinders, one was a cheap “herb grinder” I got for $9 on Amazon, and the other is a Sutra (not a real review) that I received last year that I’ve been using since. While I do love the Sutra it’s a bit different than the Groove Grinder because the shred patterns are different. While the Sutra Grinder has razor sharp shredding teeth, the Groove Grinder uses a coaxial turbine technology for a new type of shredding pattern.

It’s hard to completely remove stems from some buds, especially if they’re super sticky and most grinders will shred the stems along with your buds. That’s not the case with the new shred pattern from the Groove Grinder, it gives you a light feathery grind each time you use it and also separates unwanted materials *cough* stems and sticks *cough* and that’s pretty fucking dope!

The new radial shredding design and the end result of how well shredded my weed was had me impressed. I thought that the consistency did in fact feel different from other grinders which all use the same shredding teeth pattern, it’s nice to have different options. I did find that with stickier buds instead of falling straight through to the next chamber that some of the weed would get stuck and that became kind of bothersome. There is an easy remedy for this, I used the scraper/pick that was included and one of my vape poker tools to poke the product through.

Treat yo self and purchase a Groove Grinder from Vape World ($59.99), they come in a variety of colors.

The post Groove Grinder From Aerospace (Review) appeared first on Mrs. Nice Guy.

(Why?)

Published at Thu, 14 Sep 2017 18:22:29 +0000

Delaware Governor Signs Medical Marijuana PTSD Bill

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Delaware Governor Signs Medical Marijuana PTSD Bill

Delaware Governor John Carney has signed into law a bill that allows those with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to more easily become medical marijuana patients.

Governor Carney has signed the Bravery Bill into law, allowing those with PTSD to become legal medical marijuana patients if they receive a recommendation from a licensed physician. Before the new law those with PTSD could only get approval for medical marijuana use if they were recommended it by a licensed psychiatrist.

The Bravery Bill was introduced by Senate Majority Leader Margaret Rose Henry, and received strong bipartisan support in both the House of Representatives and Senate.

With the signing of the Bravery Bill, Delaware now joins New Hampshire, Minnesota, New Jersey, Michigan, California, Illinois, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Arizona, Washington, Rhode Island and Oregon as states that allow those with PTSD to legally use medical cannabis.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 22:32:07 +0000

The Connecticut Hospice and Medical Marijuana

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The Connecticut Hospice and Medical Marijuana

Posted by Jason Draizin on 09/15/2017 in Medical Marijuana

ct hospice marijuana

The United States has a severe opioid problem and many of the addictions begin in medical care. When a patient experiences severe pain, a doctor will sometimes prescribe opioids to relieve their symptoms. This can act as a slippery slope — one in three painkiller patients become dependent or addicted.

This addiction can be a devastating one. We desperately need to find an alternate, non-addictive medication for pain relief that patients can use to replace opioids. We’ve compiled considerable resources detailing the painkilling properties of marijuana. However, to gain legitimacy in the medical industry, we need more empirical data on marijuana medicine before it can become a mainstay.

It turns out that places like The Connecticut Hospice want to get that data to change how we view pain relief. As a member of the fight for legal medical marijuana, they want to use evidence and compassion for good.

About The Connecticut Hospice

The Connecticut Hospice knows their stuff. They’ve been in the industry for quite a while, having opened as the first American hospice in 1974. They aim to treat every patient as an entire person instead of just addressing their diagnosis or symptoms. In addition to reducing patients’ symptoms in their final days, they address their social, spiritual and emotional needs.

To meet the goal of tackling every part of a patient’s palliative care, they try to think out of the box to find new methods of care. For instance, they offer therapy animals and strolls in bed down a promenade. One of their newer approaches is medical marijuana treatment.

Medical Cannabis and Opioid in Connecticut

Connecticut legalized medical marijuana in 2012. So, while they don’t have as much experience with legalized medical marijuana as a state like California, they have enough of a foundation to move forward with clinical studies. Researchers are beginning to study cannabis safely and legally.

And just in time. More Connecticut patients become addicted to opioids every day, with prescription painkillers often serving as a “gateway drug.” While 100 people died from heroin addiction in 2012, that number went up to 400 just three years later in 2015.

Progressively, Connecticut is on the way to changing how we view conventional medicine. The Connecticut Hospice is a part of that movement.

How The Connecticut Hospice Study Began

As a hospice employee, you witness the entire process of a patients’ final days — both the good and the bad moments. Wen-Jen Hwu never forgot the experience she had with patients when she was a fellow at The Connecticut Hospice.

So, as chairman of The Connecticut Hospice’s Professional Advisory Committee, she worked together with the organization’s staff to design a study. They aim to research the impact of cannabis treatment on patients at The Connecticut Hospice who volunteer to participate.

After three years of managing paperwork, the team had their research approved in 2016. The study began in May 2017 and is still in progress at the time of writing. Since the study is slated to last six months, it will end in November 2017.

What Questions Does The Connecticut Hospice Study Aim to Answer?

If you’re familiar with research methods and standards, you may know that researchers must specify exactly what they want to find out. For instance, instead of stating that you want to study cannabis and mood, you would need to refine it into something exact like cannabidiol’s effect on depression patients.

This means that The Connecticut Hospice aims to find answers to particular questions they have about the impact of medicinal cannabis use on hospice patients. Some of the questions they ask include:

  • Does medical marijuana change the pain scores reported by hospice patients? By how much?
  • Can cannabis medicine counteract the food and digestion-related side effects of narcotic painkillers?
    • Does it improve reduced appetite due to painkillers?
    • Does it relieve nausea and vomiting caused by painkillers?
    • Can marijuana medicine reduce depression symptoms and improve the patient’s quality of life?
    • How does each component of medical marijuana impact the patient’s treatment?

Overall, The Connecticut Hospice intends to conduct and use their research the same way that they treat their patients — holistically. By looking at their data from a quality of life perspective, they can further their goals of making their patients’ palliative care a happier and healthier experience.

The Nitty-Gritty Details

In addition to specifying the exact ideas behind a study, researchers need to outline precisely how they want to get their information. They must state how many people will be involved, the dosage amounts, the time that someone gets a dose and other such numbers. Knowing these figures helps us understand how we can apply the results to things that happen in everyday life.

hospice marijuana study

The Connecticut Hospice detailed how they’re going to find the answers to their questions. Here are some facts about their methodology:

  • 65 patients are participating in the study
  • The Connecticut Hospice’s nurses will use non-invasive methods to administer medical marijuana to patients as a supplement to their opioid painkillers
  • Each patient will receive a medical cannabis capsule three times a day for a five-day period
  • Researchers will ask the patients questions about their quality of life every eight hours during the five days

Our Study on Medical Marijuana

Speaking of research, did you know that we’re conducting a survey of our own that you can take part in? Using our Symptom Tracker tool, you can enter information about the traditional medicine you take, your marijuana medicine and the symptoms you experience.

By recording the ways that marijuana benefits your health, we can help prove that marijuana is a legitimate medicine that should be federally legal. We keep your information private, so there is no need to worry about people knowing your patient status.

Using the power of data, we can change the medical industry as we know it. We hope you can join folks like The Connecticut Hospice and us in promoting alternative medicine.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

There Are Nearly 150,000 Full-Time Marijuana Jobs in the U.S., 22% Increase from Last Year

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There Are Nearly 150,000 Full-Time Marijuana Jobs in the U.S., 22% Increase from Last Year

There are 149,304 full-time marijuana-related jobs throughout the United States, according to an estimate calculated by Leafly.

This numbers marks a 22% increase from last year, when Leafly found that 122,814 jobs relied on the legal status of cannabis in America. In just 12 months, the legal cannabis industry has added 26,490 jobs to the nation’s workforce.

In order to calculate this, Leafly “devised a method that roughly translated annual sales into FTE (full time equivalent) jobs.” You can find the full explanation of that method here. As  noted by Leafly; “Not every job in the industry is a full-time gig. So these figures are FTE jobs, in which two half-time jobs equals one FTE. Also, it’s worth noting that these are jobs supported by legal cannabis. Not every one of those jobs touches the plant.”

These estimates include lawyers who advise business owners, electricians who consult on grow operations, hydroponic farming supply houses, insurance brokers, software developers, realtors who specialize in commercial cannabis real estate, etc., etc..

“Behind every one of these  jobs is a hard-working, taxpaying American”, states Leafly. “They’re the botanists at Medicine Man in Denver; the oil extraction technicians at Dama in Seattle; the budtenders at Farma in Portland; the mechanical engineers at Apeks Supercritical in Johnstown, Ohio; the scientists at Steep Hill Labs in Portland. They’re lawyers at Harris Bricken, they’re software developers at MJ Freeway Business Solutions. They’re writers, editors, web developers, event planners, and customer support specialists here at Leafly.”

Below is a list of the total number of estimated marijuana-related jobs in each state:

Alaska: 542

Adult Use and Medical

This is a tough market to figure out because such a high volume of sales occur to tourists during cruise ship season. Growing booms in summer, too, with the whole midnight sun thing happening. Depending on the month you choose, you could extrapolate to an annual market as low at $27 million and as high as $51 million. We’ll stick to the low side and estimate Alaska as a $30 million market in 2017. That supports 542 FTE jobs.

Arizona: 6,520

Medical

Arizona has 136,515 medical marijuana patients. That’s a per-capita rate of 2%, one of the highest in the nation, and it yields an annual market worth $360.8 million, which supports 6,520 jobs.

Arkansas: 11

Medical

Weeks after the application period for medical marijuana dispensary licenses, the state Department of Health had only received two completed forms. So we’re keeping our estimate of private-sector jobs at six (three for each application). Within state government, we figure there are probably about five full-time jobs supported by the need to create and carry out the licensing process. Even at mature build-out, the market here doesn’t figure to be robust. Arkansas has a population of 3 million. Qualifying conditions are strictly limited, and concern over the illegality of owning both a gun license and an MMJ card may keep a number of people from obtaining theirs. The buy-in for dispensaries is steep, too: a $15,000 application fee, and $100,000 for a license. With a tight capture rate of 0.09% (about that of New Jersey prior to its recent reforms), that would lead to an MMJ patient population of about 2,700. That’s a $7 million market, which would support about 129 jobs.

California: 47,711

Adult Use and Medical

The legal medical market in California is notoriously difficult to quantify. Last year we settled on an estimate of $2.4 billion. We’re conservatively estimating 10% growth that encompasses the natural expansion of the MMJ market as well as ramped-up hiring by companies getting ready for the 2018 opening of the state’s adult-use market. A 10% bump puts the annual value of the California market at $2.64 billion, which supports 47,711 FTE jobs.

Colorado:  26,891

Adult Use and Medical

Colorado sales, reported by the state, seem to have reached a leveling point in the past five months, averaging about $126 million per month since March. That translates into an annual market of $1.488 billion in sales, which supports 26,891 FTE jobs. We consider that a conservative estimate, because Colorado hosts an unusually high number of ancillary businesses that serve legal markets around the country. In legal affairs—to take just one sector—firms like Vicente Sederberg and Hoban Law Group have expanded rapidly and opened satellite offices in more than a half-dozen legal states.

Connecticut: 911

Medical

As of August 13, the state had 19,077 registered patients, nine dispensaries, and four producers. Based on the patient count, that’s a $50.4 million annual market, which supports 911 FTE jobs. That’s an increase of 44%, or 279 jobs, over our 2016 estimate.

Delaware: 67

Medical

Straight up: Delaware has terrible records on its medical marijuana program. The state counted 1,407 patients in FY 2016. That translates into $3.7 million in sales, which supports 67 full time jobs. That’s actually a decrease from the 81 jobs we estimated in 2016. How is that possible? It’s Delaware. They really don’t know what’s in their own data. We’re hoping for a better 2017 from Joe Biden’s old home. 

District of Columbia: 257

Adult Use and Medical

Last year we noted about 3,500 medical marijuana patients registered with the District of Columbia Department of Health. As of August 1 of this year, that number had grown to 5,372. At $2,643 in purchases per patient annually, that makes up a market worth $14.2 million—not quite double what it was late last year. That supports about 257 full time jobs.

Florida: 1,290

Medical

We’ve seen wild estimates of the state’s potential patient pool at upwards of 500,000. With a total population of 30 million, that would be a 2.5% capture rate—not impossible, but unrealistically high. In a report prepared for state officials last year, the Marijuana Policy Group estimated the patient pool at closer to 300,000. That would put the market at a value of $793 million, which would support more than 14,000 jobs. That’s at full maturity. As of July 27, though, there are only 26,968 registered patients. The growth is phenomenal; on June 7, there were 16,760 patients. At that rate, we could see up to 50,000 patients by the end of 2017. For now, we’ll base the market on 27,000 patients, call it $71.4 million, and estimate that it supports 1,290 full time jobs.

Hawaii: 860

Medical

Hawaii recorded 18,004 patients as of July 31. That translates into an annual market of $47.6 million, which supports 860 jobs. The data from Hawaii is tricky. The state has a high per-capita patient rate—with a population of 1.4 million, 18,000 patients represent a 1.25% MMJ rate—and continues to grow at a rate of about 500 new patients per month. At the same time, the first of the state’s eight licensed dispensaries only just recently opened on Maui. We’re a little hesitant to go with the 860 figure; that one dispensary isn’t supporting all those jobs, obviously. But 18,000 patients have to get their medicine somewhere. At this point most of them are accessing it, legally or semi-legally, outside of the licensed dispensary system—and that supports local growers and caregivers. We’ll call it 860 with reservations, and we’ll hope that Hawaii has all eight dispensaries open by this time next year.

Illinois: 1,352

Medical

The Illinois Department of Public Health’s Medical Cannabis Division counts 27,100 patients as of August. That pencils out to about $71.6 million in annual sales. State records show that sales through the first seven months of 2017 came to $43.6 million, which puts annual sales at $74.8 million. We’ll go with that figure, which supports 1,352 jobs. That’s an increase of 466 jobs, or a growth rate of 49%, over the past year.

Louisiana: 22

Medical (soon)

When it comes to Louisiana’s medical marijuana program, very little makes sense to us. Earlier this year, the Las Vegas-based cannabis company GB Sciences agreed to pay Louisiana State University $1.2 million per year for five years for permission to grow medical cannabis at a secure location on the LSU campus. Patients are expected to access the market in 2018. Using $1.2 million per year as a kind of “market,” we figure that supports at least 22 FTE jobs at LSU.

Maine: 942

Adult Use and Medical

Homegrow is huge in Maine. How do we know? There are 51,324 registered medical marijuana patients in the state. That should translate into about $135 million in annual sales. Instead, the state only recorded $26.8 million in dispensary sales in 2016. Industry officials estimated an additional $27.3 million in caregiver sales in 2016. That’s a total market of $52.1 million, which supports 942 jobs.

Maryland: 559

Medical

Medical Maryland still hasn’t opened its dispensaries, but they say they’ll be serving patients by the end of 2017. In the meantime, there are actually quite a few people working in Maryland’s cannabis industry already, gearing up for opening day. And we have some unique data on those jobs. Because Maryland’s medical marijuana law contains diversity clauses, the state keeps statistical information on industry owners and employees. According to that data, there are currently 559 people working in the cannabis industry in Maryland.

Massachusetts: 1,873

Adult Use and Medical

As of July 31, the Massachusetts Department of Health and Human Services recorded 39,202 active registered patients. That translates into an existing medical market worth about $103.6 million, which supports 1,873 jobs. About 800 new patients join the registry every month. The opening of the adult-use market next year is expected to change all that, of course. With 6.8 million residents, Massachusetts has a population nearly the size of Washington’s—with another 4.5 million people in Connecticut and Rhode Island within driving distance. It wouldn’t be surprising to see annual sales approaching $1 billion by 2019.

Michigan: 12,515

Medical

The state reported 218,556 registered patients in late 2016. We estimate a 10% growth in those numbers over the course of this year, putting the patient count at around 240,400. We can extrapolate that to an annual market of $635.4 million, which supports 11,483 jobs.

Minnesota: 295

Medical

In one of the nation’s most restrictive medical marijuana programs, Minnesota’s two licensed cannabis manufacturers have lost $11 million in the past two years. The reason? Not enough patients. That’s changing. According to quarterly data from the Minnesota Department of Health, the state recorded 6,184 patients on June 30. That’s nearly double the total from 2016. The annual market is around $16.3 million, enough to support 295 jobs.

Montana: 621

Medical

Montana’s entire MMJ industry went through a painful shutdown last year; after a November ballot measure revived dispensaries, patients are finding medicine again. As of July, the state counted 17,819 patients, with 616 providers. That translates into a $47.1 million annual market, which supports 851 jobs. That’s a decrease from our late 2016 estimate, because of all the dispensary closures in 2016.

Nevada: 4,193

Adult Use and Medical

Nevada isn’t expected to release first-month adult use sales figures until later this fall, so we’ve had to do some back-of-the-envelope estimating here. There are 60 cannabis stores open in Nevada. The majority are in the Las Vegas area; nearly all the rest are in Reno/Sparks. Based on what we know from other adult-use states, we’ll estimate that the state’s top 10 stores will bring in $750,000 a month by the end of the year. The next 35 will realize $300,000 per month, with the bottom 15 bringing in about $90,000 a month. That adds up to annual sales of $232 million, which supports 4,193 jobs. We expect that number to continue to rise as a stop at a legal cannabis store becomes a part of the Vegas experience for many of the city’s 43 million annual visitors.

New Hampshire: 100

Medical

New Hampshire just opened its medical marijuana program up to patients with chronic pain and/or PTSD, which should expand the patient base considerably. In its 2016 annual report, the state’s Therapeutic Cannabis Program Registry counted 2,089 patients. That should support a market of around $5.5 million, which in turn supports 100 jobs.

New Jersey: 516

Medical

New Jersey counted 10,799 active patients in 2016. That’s an annual market of $28.5 million, which supports 516 jobs.

New Mexico: 1,102

Medical

As of July, the state had 45,441 active patients licensed, and 6,182 active personal production licensees. $15.2 million worth of medical marijuana products were purchased in the second quarter of 2017. That extrapolates into an annual market worth $60.8 million, which supports 1,102 full time jobs. That’s an increase of 52%, or 379 jobs, over our 2016 estimate.

New York: 1,341

Medical

The inclusion of chronic pain as a qualifying condition has finally made New York State’s medical marijuana program viable. Since adding the condition in March, the state’s patient population has grown by 87%. New York is now adding about 3,000 patients every month. The New York Department of Health had 28,077 patients registered as of Aug. 22. That translates into an annual market of $74.2 million, which supports 1,341 jobs. That’s more than twice as many jobs as in late 2016—an increase of 121%.

North Dakota: 6

Medical

The state of North Dakota has budgeted money for six full-time employees at the Department of Health. Until they roll out the regulations and grant licenses, there isn’t much else happening here.

Ohio: 90

Medical

Ohio’s market isn’t open yet, but plenty of people are already hard at work. In July, 185 companies applied for Ohio’s 24 available medical cannabis growing licenses. The state has also awarded substantial contracts for seed-to-sale tracking systems and licensing design. The medical market in Ohio could eventually be significant, as state law allows for a wide variety of qualifying conditions, including chronic pain. If 0.5% of the population carries a card, that’s a market of 55,000 patients, or around $150 million annually. For now, though, we’ll estimate that each of those applying companies required the work of at least one half-time partner. So 90 FTE jobs.

Oregon: 10,843

Adult Use and Medical

According to the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission, sales for the past five months have averaged $43.32 million, with a rise of about $5 million in sales every month. We estimate that by the end of 2017, Oregon will be a $600 million annual market. That supports 10,843 jobs.

Pennsylvania: 90

Medical

Pennsylvania granted 27 permits for MMJ dispensaries on June 29. Each is eligible to open a total of three locations. There are expected to be 52 open within the year (total). If you figure at least three full time owners/operators of those dispensaries, that’s about 90 jobs right now. The dispensaries may become operational on Jan. 1, 2018.

Puerto Rico: 215

Medical

A few months ago, the US territory has 4,000 registered patients, with 7,000 more awaiting their patient IDs. We’ll estimate 4,500 patients with cards by now. That equals a market size of $11.89 million, which supports 215 FTE jobs.

Rhode Island: 781

Medical

The state’s 16,360 patients and 3,000 caregivers translate into a $43.2 million market, which supports 781 jobs. That’s an increase of 78%, or 342 additional jobs, over 2016.

Vermont: 227

Medical

Vermont’s patient count is rising slowly, by about 29 new patients per week. The state doesn’t report its patient counts very often. Last November they had 3,487. By this June, they tallied 4,438. By Sept. 1, we expect the state to have 4,750 patients registered. That pencils out to an annual market of $12.5 million, which supports 227 jobs. That’s a 59% increase over 2016.

Washington: 26,556

Adult Use and Medical

Sales for the past four months (March–June) averaged $122.4 million. We expect Washington to nearly hit $1.5 billion in sales in 2017, at $1.469 billion. That supports 26,556 jobs.

West Virginia: 5

Medical

Move along, folks, nothing to see here. The Bureau for Public Health may not issue patient ID cards until July 1, 2019. The Bureau is currently drafting rules to implement the Medical Cannabis Act signed into law on April 19, 2017. We figure there may be 5 FTE jobs for state employees working out the regulatory system.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 13 Sep 2017 02:15:19 +0000

Ontario Announces Framework for Legal Marijuana – 150 Stores by 2020, Online Sales by July, 2018

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Ontario Announces Framework for Legal Marijuana – 150 Stores by 2020, Online Sales by July, 2018

The Ontario government has announced a framework for legal marijuana.

The plan, unveiled yesterday, will allow online as well as brick-and-mortar cannabis stores. Ontario officials expect there to be 80 marijuana stores open by July 1st, 2019, with 150 open by the following year. Online sales are expected to start throughout Ontario by July of 2018. The government is proposing a minimum age of 19 for purchasing marijuana from one of these outlets.

The plan was unveiled by Attorney General Yasir Naqvi, Finance Minister Charles Sousa and Health Minister Eric Hoskins. The announcement makes Ontario the first province or territory in Canada to publicly put forth a comprehensive framework for marijuana, which will be legal throughout Canada by next year.

According to Naqvi, one of the primary goals of the plan is “stopping the sale of illegal, unregulated and unsafe cannabis”.

For cannabis retail outlets; “Trained and knowledgeable staff will sell products in a safe and socially responsible manner to restrict access for minors and give consumers the information they need,” said the Ministry of Finance in a statement.

Under the proposed framework, cannabis outlets would follow the same standards that apply to outlets that sell alcohol, as well as federal requirements for cannabis sales. This includes no self-service and mandatory training for staff members.

For online sales, the ministry says it will ensurte “secure and safe” delivery across Ontario.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Sat, 09 Sep 2017 21:33:41 +0000

Pot has never been so cheap

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Pot has never been so cheap

The Columbian / Associated Press

All the diverse effects of legalizing recreational marijuana may not be clear for a number of years, but one consequence has become evident almost immediately: Pot has never been so cheap.

Steven Davenport of the Pardee Rand Graduate School has analyzed marijuana retail prices in Washington since legal recreational markets opened in July 2014. Remarkably, prices have fallen every single quarter since.

When Davenport spoke to me 18 months ago, retail marijuana prices had already fallen a stunning 58.5 percent. Yet he predicted correctly that the price collapse was not complete. The current retail price of $7.38 per gram (including tax) represents a 67 percent decrease in three years of the legalization, with more decline likely in the future.

Davenport expects the marijuana industry to continue to find ways to lower prices for a simple reason: It’s a profitable business model. “Some consumers will prefer higher priced brands, but there will always be a market for the brand that can produce adequate quality cannabis at the cheapest cost,” he notes.

The ongoing decline in marijuana’s price after legalization has an important implication for drug policy more generally. The experience of Washington and other marijuana legalization states demonstrates how enormously effective prohibition of production and sale is at raising drug prices. For example heroin’s price took a decade to fall by 16 percent, which the legalization of marijuana accomplished in just eight months. Notably, even high taxes on legal marijuana don’t keep the legal price anywhere near what it was when the drug was more broadly illegal.

Prohibition imposes huge costs on drug producing industries that are passed on to consumers in the form of higher prices. These higher prices are one of the principal reasons (the others being stigma and fear of punishment) that illegal drugs are used so much less frequently than legal drugs such as alcohol and tobacco. Marijuana is a rare example where we can see the impact of legalizing a drug in real time, which shows that were the production and sale of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine also legalized, those drugs would also become dramatically cheaper to consume.

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Published at Wed, 06 Sep 2017 13:00:34 +0000

Pot shop clashes with tourism in eclectic Alaska town

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Pot shop clashes with tourism in eclectic Alaska town

The Columbian / Associated Press

TALKEETNA, Alaska — The presence of a marijuana retail store has caused a deep divide in this quirky tourist town, where hundreds of visitors roam the streets daily browsing in art galleries and souvenir shops housed in historic cabins.

Most of Talkeetna’s stores line the two long blocks that make up its Main Street, where tourists — many who arrive in Alaska on cruise ships and are bused about two hours north from Anchorage — wander into storefronts like Nagley’s General Store for ice cream or slip through its back door for a cold one at the West Rib Bar and Grill.

At Main Street’s opposite end, near a river park where visitors snap photos of the continent’s tallest mountain, is Talkeetna’s newest venture into the tourism trade. The High Expedition Co. is a nod to the rich mountain climbing history of the eclectic community purported to be the inspiration for the 1990s television series “Northern Exposure.”

Talkeetna’s first marijuana retail store is causing a rift not seen in other tourist-dependent towns in this Libertarian-leaning state, where marijuana had a casual acceptance long before it became legal. But even here, like in many pot-legal states, some towns have opted out of sales, fearful it might invite crime and other evils.

In Talkeetna, some shop owners — the ones who built a multimillion-dollar business from the steady stream of mountain climbers who use Talkeetna as a staging point for treks up Denali — say this one shop could ruin the tiny town’s historic atmosphere and harm business like the eight or so stores that serve alcohol along Main Street could never do.

“I don’t think he belongs in downtown Talkeetna,” Meandering Moose B&B owner Mike Stoltz said.

Joe McAneney co-owns the High Expedition Co., which opened in mid-May. “The sky hasn’t fallen on Talkeetna, the sun is shining, and this is now the most photographed shop in town,” he said.

Grabbing the attention of amateur shutterbugs is a small “Cannabis Purveyors” wooden sign on the store’s deck.

McAneney has been working to open the shop nearly since the day in 2014 that Alaska residents voted to legalize recreational marijuana. He and a partner bought the cabin that was originally built for Ray Genet, an early Talkeetna climber and guide who died in 1979 on Mount Everest. McAneney worked with Genet’s family and has incorporated a small museum dedicated to Genet and Talkeetna’s climbing history. But even that association led to some disdain.

“Small towns in Alaska are harder than anywhere to break into and sort of become accepted,” McAneney said.

His store got its approval from the borough on a technicality when the assembly was writing regulations for marijuana businesses in unincorporated areas, like Talkeetna, and inadvertently omitted special land use districts — like the town’s Main Street. Talkeetna has no local governing body, only a nonvoting community council whose sole power is sending recommendations to borough officials roughly 75 miles away.

State regulators approved the store’s permit on a 3-2 vote in the spring.

“There’s people that are upset about it, but it’s legal,” said Sue Deyoe, the Talkeetna Historical Society and Museum’s executive director.

Opposition mounted as the issue went before state regulators, where a stream of residents unsuccessfully called in to the Anchorage meeting to oppose the store’s license.

Among the biggest issue for critics is the lack of places for tourists to puff the marijuana they buy — smoking pot in public is illegal, and that led to fears the nearby river park would become the place to partake.

Alaska State Troopers say there were no citations issued for anyone consuming marijuana in public in Talkeetna from April 1 to July 1, the same as last year.

But opponents argue Talkeetna is lawless, with the closest trooper an hour away.

“What are we supposed to do?” asked Stoltz, the bed and breakfast owner. “Are we going to take the law into our own hands? Duct-tape him?”

Stoltz said the very presence of a pot store will harm business in the historic town, where residents make a year’s living between Memorial Day and Labor Day.

“If we lose our tourism, we lose what Talkeetna is,” he said. “We’re not catering to stoner tourists. To me, that’s the conflict with Joe.”

Seeing a pot shop on Talkeetna’s main drag didn’t bother 65-year-old Jeff White, visiting from the Louisville, Ky., area.

Talkeetna has the artsy feel of a tourist town in Colorado, which also has legal marijuana, he said.

“This goes with that vibe, and I think that’s fine.”

One resident dismisses the idea that the pot store is giving Talkeetna a black eye. But it is dividing the town, Christie Stoltz said, noting the chasm has reached her home. She’s the daughter of Mike Stoltz, the B&B owner.

“I feel like it’s generations — the older generation versus the younger generation,” she said.

For some, marijuana was never an issue, Deyoe said, and it pales in comparison to a controversy last spring when the borough proposed leveling trees over an area about the size of eight football fields for an expanded parking lot for summer use.

“I think the community council got way more letters on that than they did in reaction to the marijuana shop,” she said.

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 05 Sep 2017 13:00:46 +0000

Oregon wildfires worry cannabis growers

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Oregon wildfires worry cannabis growers

The Columbian / Associated Press

PORTLAND — Wildfires scorching hundreds of acres in Southern Oregon are prompting evacuations, canceling popular performances of the Ashland Shakespeare Festival and casting a smoky cloud over the region’s most famous crop.

Marijuana growers say the wildfires have turned what normally would be the sun-drenched end of summer into a smoky haze that has affected their plants and field workers.

“The smoke down here is choking out everything,” said Brent Kenyon, a longtime marijuana grower in Eagle Point who owns Oregon Cannabis Farms.

He said the haze has covered the crop like a “plastic layer” sealing out direct sunlight as the plants head into its critical flowering stage.

Michael Monarch, owner of Epic Family Farms in Talent, Ore., said he sent field workers home early on Wednesday because of poor air quality.

“The smoke is not fun at all,” he said. “We are wearing masks and dealing with the carbon in the air.”

Jackson and Josephine counties make up the epicenter of outdoor marijuana production in Oregon. The Oregon Health Authority’s latest statistics show that the counties are home to nearly 10,000 registered medical marijuana growers; the Oregon Liquor Control Commission said another 264 licensed recreational producers operate in the county.

The Miller Complex is burning more than 12,000 acres near the border of Jackson and Josephine counties. The fires are active but moving slowly, according to authorities. Dense smoke and poor air quality are expected to persist for now. An evacuation order has been issued for an area of the Applegate Valley.

Fire and smoky conditions are expected to linger into early fall — or until the region sees a good rainstorm, said Brian Ballou, a spokesman for the Incident Information System, an interagency clearinghouse for wildfire information.

“The best thing anyone can hope for is a really good, wetting rain storm,” he said.

For most growers, the problems posed by the fires are a nuisance, said Cedar Grey, whose company grows hemp and cannabis.

Grey said the wildfires are a topic of conversation among growers, but their concerns are less about their crops and more about losing homes to fire. One fire that’s part of the Miller Complex isn’t far from Gray’s home.

“This is one of the worse years we have ever had for sure,” he said. “At this point I think most of the growers that are impacted are medical growers who are living very rurally, but the fires are coming closer to the center of communities.”

(Why?)

Published at Thu, 31 Aug 2017 23:17:49 +0000