Court: Neighbors can sue pot grower over stinky smells

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Court: Neighbors can sue pot grower over stinky smells

The Columbian / Associated Press

DENVER — A pot farm’s neighbor can sue them for smells and other nuisances that could harm their property values, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday.

The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling revives a lawsuit between a Colorado horse farm and a neighboring marijuana-growing warehouse.

The horse farm’s owners, the Reillys, sued in 2015, claiming the pot-growing warehouse would diminish their land’s value by emitting “noxious odors” and attracting unsavory visitors. A federal district court dismissed the claim, and the pot warehouse opened in 2016.

The horse farm owners appealed, and a three-judge appeals panel agreed Wednesday that their claims should be heard. But the judges said the Reillys can’t sue Colorado to force the state to enforce federal drug law and not allow the pot warehouse in the first place.

The southern Colorado horse-vs-pot case is interesting because the horse farm owners are trying to use a 1970 federal law crafted to fight organized crime. The Reillys say that federal racketeering laws entitle them to collect damages from the pot farm, even though the pot farm is legal under state law.

“The landowners have plausibly alleged at least one (racketeering) claim,” the judges wrote.

Pot opponents say the racketeering strategy gives them a possible tool to break an industry they oppose. It could give private citizens who oppose pot legalization a way to sue the industry out of business, even as federal officials have so far declined to shut down most pot businesses operating in violation of federal drug law.

“This is a tremendous victory for opponents of the marijuana industry,” said Brian Barnes, a Washington-based lawyer who represents the Reillys on behalf of the anti-crime nonprofit group Safe Streets Alliance.

Owners of the pot warehouse, owned by a company called Alternative Holistic Healing, did not immediately return a call for comment Wednesday. An attorney representing them in the case could not be reached, either.

The case now goes to back to a federal district court that had earlier dismissed it.

The appeals panel handed pot opponents a defeat on another case Wednesday, however. The judges ruled that a lower court was right to dismiss a claim from a group of sheriffs in Colorado, Nebraska and Oklahoma, who had asked the federal court to block Colorado’s pot law.

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Published at Thu, 08 Jun 2017 03:15:05 +0000

Vermont Governor Signs Bill Allowing Medical Marijuana for PTSD, Crohn’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease

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Vermont Governor Signs Bill Allowing Medical Marijuana for PTSD, Crohn’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease

A bill expanding Vermont’s medical marijuana program has been signed into law by Governor Phil Scott.

Senate Bill 16 was signed into law yesterday by Governor Scott, following overwhelming approval in the state’s House and Senate. The measure expands Vermont’s medical cannabis program, including adding three new qualifying conditions; post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Crohn’s Disease and Parkinson’s diseasey.

Senate Bill 16 also doubles the number of medical cannabis dispensaries in the state from four to eight, increase the amount of cannabis a patient can possess to three ounces, and allow patients to grow cannabis at home even when they have a designated dispensary (which wasn’t previously allowed).

In addition, the new law allows dispensaries to advertise, waves the three-month patient-health care professional relationship requirement “when the patient is referred to a specialist who completes a full examination and signs the medical verification form”, allows patients and caregivers to cultivate cannabis at home even if they have a designated dispensary, allows dispensaries to become for-profit, and requires the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets to “independently test marijuana-infused edible or potable products sold by a dispensary to ensure the appropriate labeling of the tetraydrocannabinol content.”

Cllick here for the full text of Senate Bill 16.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Fri, 09 Jun 2017 23:11:21 +0000

Louisiana House Approves Marijuana Research Resolution, Full Legislature Approves Medical Marijuana Bill

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Louisiana House Approves Marijuana Research Resolution, Full Legislature Approves Medical Marijuana Bill

Louisiana’s House of Representatives has passed House Resolution 1899, and the full legislature has approved Senate Bill 35.

House Resolution 1899, sponsored by Representative Frank Hoffman, was passed by the House with a unanimous 93 to 0 vote. 12 member abstained from voting.

According to its official legislative digest, House Resolution 189: “Urges and requests the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Centers at New Orleans and Shreveport, the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, and the Louisiana State University and Southern University Agricultural Centers to pursue opportunities for basic research, applied research, and clinical trials to evaluate the safety and clinical efficacy of marijuana for therapeutic use.”

The full text of the three-page measure can be found by clicking here.

A separate marijuana-related measure, Senate Bill 35, was recently sent to Governor Bel Edwards for consideration. That measure would exempt those involved in the state’s medical marijuana program from arrest and prosecution. For the full text if Senate Bill 35, click here.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Thu, 08 Jun 2017 03:34:59 +0000

States take steps to entice minority marijuana entrepreneurs

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States take steps to entice minority marijuana entrepreneurs

The Columbian / Associated Press

Some states that have legalized marijuana are encouraging minorities to enter the growing cannabis industry after years of drug enforcement that had a disproportionate effect on black and Hispanic communities. A look at some of the efforts nationwide:

WASHINGTON

Recreational pot was legalized in Washington in 2012. The state has nearly 500 licensed retail stores.

Nearly 3 percent of retail license holders are African-American in a state where black people are 3.5 percent of the population . In 2015, African-Americans made up 11 percent of marijuana arrests.

Brian Smith, spokesman for the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board, said the board is interested in diversifying licensees and may use targeted outreach to ethnic communities if they decide to license more people in the future.

——

CALIFORNIA

California voters legalized recreational marijuana in November. The first retail sales are expected in January.

Oakland officials approved a program that initially sets aside half of the city’s marijuana licenses for low-income residents who have been convicted of a cannabis crime or who live in a specified neighborhood where drug enforcement has been intense. Advocates are urging similar programs statewide, including in San Francisco and Los Angeles.

African-Americans made up 5.6 percent of the state but 16 percent of marijuana arrests in 2015, according to an AP analysis of statistics collected by the FBI.

——

COLORADO

The first state to legalize marijuana for recreational use does not track industry demographics. A spokesman for the Denver department that oversees marijuana policy, Daniel Rowland, said individual businesses have programs to employ minorities, but nothing is mandated by the city.

A report by the Colorado Public Safety Department found that arrest rates for African-American and Latino juveniles increased after legalization, while the rate for white juveniles went down.

African-Americans made up nearly 4 percent of the Colorado population in 2015 and 11 percent of arrests.

——

FLORIDA

Florida lawmakers passed a bill last year to address issues that arose with the state’s 2014 medical marijuana law, including provisions to favor black farmers.

The provisions ensure that once the state’s medical marijuana patient registry reaches 250,000, three additional cultivation licenses will be made available, with one of them designated for a member of the Florida Black Farmers and Agriculturists Association.

Black farmers in Florida were among thousands across the country who sued the U.S. Department of Agriculture for racial discrimination, saying they had been unfairly denied government loans and subsidies in the 1980s and 1990s. The case ended with an historic settlement in 1999.

——

MARYLAND

The state’s rollout of medical marijuana has been marred by lawsuits filed by groups that were not among the 15 chosen by the state for cultivation licenses. None of the 15 was minority-owned, despite language in the law that requires regulators to seek “racial, ethnic and geographical diversity” in the awarding of licenses.

The General Assembly ended its legislative session last month without acting on a bill designed to create diversity by allowing up to seven more licenses to grow marijuana, with two going to companies that are suing the state and five others for minority-owned companies after a disparity study is conducted. The Legislature’s Black Caucus has called for a special session to consider the bill.

Minority groups comprise about 48 percent of Maryland’s population, including nearly 30 percent African-American. Blacks made up roughly 57 percent of cannabis arrests in 2015.

——

MASSACHUSETTS

The 2016 ballot question that legalized recreational marijuana included language to encourage participation in the cannabis industry by people who were “disproportionately harmed” by enforcement of marijuana laws in the past. The law does not exclude people with past marijuana convictions from applying for a retail license or working in a cannabis business.

Boston City Council member Ayanna Pressley has drafted proposed legislation that would direct 20 percent of unexpended revenue from state and local marijuana taxes toward programs to assure racial equity, including efforts to reduce financial barriers to ownership of businesses.

In 2015, African-Americans made up nearly 7 percent of the state’s population but 34 percent of cannabis arrests.

——

OHIO

The state’s 2016 medical marijuana law included some licenses set aside for minority businesses, but it’s questionable whether that provision would stand in court.

The benchmarks require at least 15 percent of Ohio’s marijuana-related licenses to go to the businesses of one of four economically disadvantaged minority groups — blacks, Hispanics, Asians or Native Americans — so long as an adequate number apply.

Legal experts have questioned whether the racial-preference provision would stand up in court, though no legal challenge has been filed to date.

African-Americans made up 12 percent of the state’s population in 2015, but 35 percent of arrests.

——

PENNSYLVANIA

Lawmakers passed a medical marijuana law in 2016, and subsequent regulations written by the Pennsylvania Department of Health included policies to ensure that medical cannabis organizations “foster participation of diverse groups in all aspects of their operations.”

Specifically, the rules require that applicants for cultivation and dispensing permits include in their initial applications a diversity plan that spells out how they will achieve racial equity through ownership, employment and contracting.

The agency is also required to make special efforts to help minorities learn how to apply for cultivation and dispensing permits. At least four predominantly minority groups have applied for medical marijuana permits, according to Philadelphia City Councilman Derek Green.

African-Americans were nearly 11 percent of the state in 2015 and made up 35 percent of arrests.

——

WEST VIRGINIA

The state in April became the 29th in the U.S. to approve of marijuana use for certain medical conditions. The new law includes a provision requiring state regulators to seek ways of encouraging minority-owned businesses to apply for growing licenses.

African Americans were nearly 4 percent of the state in 2015 and made up 19 percent of arrests.

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 31 May 2017 18:05:16 +0000

Lawmakers Approve Measure to Make California a Sanctuary State for Marijuana

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Lawmakers Approve Measure to Make California a Sanctuary State for Marijuana

California’s full legislature has given approval to legislation to make Cali a sanctuary state for marijuana.

Assembly Bill 1578 was passed yesterday with a 41 to 33 vote by the California Assembly. Given the measure passed the Senate 28 to 7 in April, it will now be sent to Governor Jerry Brown for consideration. Governor  Brown has the option of signing it into law, allowing it to become law without his signature, or vetoing it.

If the bill does become law, Assembly Bill 1578 will prohibit state and local agencies from using “money, facilities, property, equipment, or personnel to assist a federal agency to investigate, detain, detect, report, or arrest a person for commercial or noncommercial marijuana or medical cannabis activity that is authorized by law in the State of California”, unless there is a court order signed by a judge.

It would also prevent them from responding to a request “made by a federal agency for personal information about an individual who is authorized to possess, cultivate, transport, manufacture, sell, or possess for sale marijuana or marijuana products or medical cannabis or medical cannabis products, if that request is made for the purpose of investigating or enforcing federal marijuana law.”

The measure also clarifies that state and local agencies would also not be allowed to “Provide information about a person who has applied for or received a license to engage in commercial marijuana or commercial medical cannabis activity pursuant to MCRSA or AUMA”, or “Transfer an individual to federal law enforcement authorities for purposes of marijuana enforcement or detain an individual at the request of federal law enforcement for conduct that is legal under state law.”

The proposal “ensures that our limited local and state resources are not spent on federal marijuana enforcement against individuals and entities that are in compliance with our laws,” Assemblyman Reggie Jones-Sawyer – the bill’s lead sponsor – said during a debate on the Assembly floor.

You can click here for the full text of Assembly Bill 1578,.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 21:21:06 +0000

Nevada Hemp Legalization Bill Signed Into Law by Governor

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Nevada Hemp Legalization Bill Signed Into Law by Governor

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval has signed into law a bill legalizing hemp.

Senate Bill 396 received unanimous approval in the Senate in April, and last month was approved by the full Assembly with a 34 to 5 vote. Now, it has been signed into law by Governor Sandoval.

Senate Bill 396 expands a current law that allows hemp to be grown in the state for research purposes by creating “a separate program for the growth and cultivation of industrial hemp and produce agricultural hemp seed in this State”; this would allow hemp to be grown for commercial – and not exclusively research – purposes.

The measure “requires a person who wishes to grow or handle industrial hemp or produce agricultural hemp seed to register with the Department [of Agriculture”, and “requires the testing of commodities or products made using industrial hemp by an independent testing laboratory”

The bill also “allows a facility for the production of edible marijuana products or marijuana-infused products and a medical marijuana dispensary to acquire industrial hemp from a registered grower or handler”, and “allows a facility for the production of edible marijuana products or marijuana-infused products to use industrial hemp to manufacture edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused product”.

Finally, the proposal “allows a medical marijuana dispensary to dispense industrial hemp and edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products containing industrial hemp”, and  “requires the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department of Health and Human Services to adopt regulations setting forth minimum requirements for industrial hemp which is used by a facility for the production of edible marijuana products or marijuana-infused products to manufacture such products or which is dispensed by a medical marijuana dispensary”.

Cllick here for the full text of Senate Bill 396

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 22:41:01 +0000

V.A. Hospitals and Marijuana

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V.A. Hospitals and Marijuana

Posted by Jason Draizin on 06/01/2017 in Medical Marijuana

V.A. and medical marijuana

Several states in the U.S. have legalized marijuana use in some capacity. For most of those states, medical marijuana is the primary purpose of legalization. However, state laws and federal law don’t agree on the subject of marijuana, with marijuana still classified as a Schedule I controlled substance by the federal government. This places many restrictions on the use and prescription of marijuana — especially for veterans.

Medical Marijuana and Veterans

Veterans face many health challenges not normally faced by the general population. Issues like chronic pain and PTSD are rampant among veteran populations. Unfortunately, this has led to many substance problems, particularly related to opioids. In fact, the death rate from opioids among veterans is almost double the national average.

Marijuana poses a viable alternative to opioids for many veterans dealing with chronic pain, PTSD and other physical and psychological conditions. Versatile and non-lethal even in high doses, marijuana is an excellent resource for veterans and is currently approved as a treatment for PTSD in 14 states out of the 23 states in which medical marijuana is legal.

Unfortunately, federal legislation regarding medical marijuana still lags behind state laws, which poses several problems for patients seeking care. Particularly problematic is veteran care, since veterans seeking care through a V.A. hospital cannot get a medical marijuana prescription through their normal channels due to federal regulations.

Why Can’t V.A. Hospitals Prescribe Marijuana?

The DEA employs a drug scale that has five schedules. The higher the number, the less dangerous the drug. Marijuana is listed as a Schedule I drug, the most dangerous classification. This classification means marijuana can’t be used for medical purposes and has a high potential for abuse. Because of this classification, marijuana is not recognized as a medically significant drug by the federal government.

V.A. marijuana laws

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is a federal institution, meaning it is required to follow all federal laws, including those regarding marijuana. As such, V.A. hospitals and employees working within them are prohibited from recommending or prescribing marijuana as a medical treatment, even if the V.A. hospital is located in a state where marijuana is legal.

So why hasn’t this changed yet? The primary reason medical marijuana still isn’t recognized by the V.A. is that the V.A. recommends its physicians employ “evidence-based” practices proven by scientific research to be effective. Unfortunately, because it is a federally restricted substance, marijuana has undergone little medical research, especially concerning mental and physical conditions like chronic pain and PTSD.

While many veteran and marijuana legalization advocacy groups have collected statements from individuals supporting the efficacy of marijuana for treating pain and PTSD, the V.A. and its physicians will not budge until the law changes or scientific proof is published.

What Does This Mean for Veterans?

While V.A. hospitals face these restrictions, veterans aren’t held to the same requirements. For those living in states where marijuana is legal, medical marijuana is still a viable choice for veterans seeking an alternative type of medication for their chronic pain, PTSD, depression or anxiety condition.

If you are a veteran living in a state where medical marijuana is legalized, keep the following guidelines in mind:

  • Access to V.A. Healthcare: If you sign up for a state-approved medical marijuana program, it will not affect your standing regarding V.A. healthcare. Even though the V.A. cannot prescribe or provide marijuana, the V.A. cannot refuse services to veterans participating in state-approved marijuana programs, especially if their use is approved by a non-V.A. healthcare provider.
  • Possession is Prohibited: If you do use medical marijuana, do not bring it to a V.A. medical center. These centers operate under federal law, so possession of marijuana within V.A. centers is still considered a crime. If your V.A. physician requests information about your medical marijuana treatment program, write down the information about your strain and bring it to your appointment instead of bringing your marijuana.

Don’t leave it in your car, either — the grounds of a V.A. medical center also fall under federal law and possession of marijuana on V.A. grounds is still illegal.

  • Seek Prescription Elsewhere: While you can discuss your medical marijuana prescription with them, you will not be able to receive a marijuana prescription from a V.A. clinician. They also cannot help you complete the paperwork required for veterans to participate in state-approved medical marijuana programs. They can, however, direct you to a non-V.A. healthcare provider.
  • Seek Distribution Elsewhere: Even if you have a prescription for medical marijuana, V.A. pharmacies cannot and will not fill prescriptions for medical marijuana. Not only do they not have marijuana, but they also cannot give it to you, as it’s a controlled substance the federal government does not recognize as medically useful.
  • Seek Alternative Financing: Even though the state may recognize marijuana as a medically useful substance, the federal government and V.A. do not. As such, the V.A. will not pay for your medical marijuana prescription.
  • Discuss Marijuana Use: Even though the V.A. cannot prescribe or recommend marijuana as a treatment option, they can discuss your marijuana use with you. In fact, it is wise for you to discuss your marijuana use with your V.A. clinician, since weed does interact with other drugs, especially anesthesia.

They can advise you on how marijuana will impact other aspects of your care and how it will interact with other medications you’re taking, so it’s important that your V.A. healthcare provider know about your usage so they can account for it in your healthcare regimen and change your prescriptions if need be. It is worthwhile to mention, however, that if you mention your marijuana use to your V.A. clinician, it will show up in your V.A. medical record.

  • Consider Your Employment: Veterans who are employees of the V.A. are subject to regular drug testing. Because marijuana is still a federally controlled substance, the V.A. can test for it and terminate employment if THC is found in your system.

Medical Marijuana and PTSD

While many veterans obviously suffer from many types of medical conditions that can be treated with medical marijuana, one that affects a high proportion of vets is post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. There is strong evidence that vets suffering nightmares, difficulty sleeping and flashbacks can benefit greatly from the use of cannabis. While no one suggests it can cure the problem, it can definitely be a very important, effective tool in an overall treatment program.

When they are denied access to medical marijuana, veterans suffering from PTSD are often prescribed powerful opiates that are not only incredibly expensive, but can also result in devastating — and potentially even deadly — side effects. Opiates that are commonly prescribed include:

  • Hydrocodone
  • Oxycodone, which is commonly referred to as “Oxy”
  • Morphine
  • Methadone
  • Tramadol

These drugs not only have a high potential for abuse, but they can also lead to complications such as liver damage, respiratory depression, brain damage, abdominal distention, paranoia and fatal overdoses. On the other hand, there are no reports on record of anyone ever dying from a marijuana overdose.

Without treatment, PTSD sufferers are highly susceptible to suicidal thoughts — which are, tragically, often put into action. Many experts estimate that, at the very least, an average of 20 veterans commit suicide every day. Many others prescribed opiates for their condition suffer fatal overdoses. Vets who have to turn to the VA for their medical care cannot obtain prescriptions for medical marijuana, even though they may be living in a state where it’s legal.

Keep Up on Marijuana Law

Marijuana law is steadily changing, with new developments appearing on a regular basis. Just last year, an amendment to the V.A.’s budget bill was originally written to allow V.A. physicians to recommend medical marijuana in states where medical marijuana is legalized. It wouldn’t have allowed the V.A. to provide marijuana for these patients, but it would have allowed physicians to talk to their patients about it and complete the necessary paperwork to join state-sponsored marijuana programs.While this amendment didn’t end up passing, similar amendments may appear in the future.

veterans and medical marijuana

May 2016: A Sign of Progress

Veterans advocacy groups have fought for access to medical marijuana for years to treat PTSD and other conditions. Their efforts looked to have proven successful when the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives approved the Veterans Equal Access Amendment on May 26. This amendment called for an end to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) using federal money to stop government-employed doctors from recommending medical marijuana as a treatment option in states where it is legal.

This was an astounding sign of progress, as it was the first time the House and Senate agreed to this type of amendment, one that would remove many of the restrictions that kept vets from gaining legal access to medical cannabis.

The previous two years, the House had prevented the amendment from passing through Congress. But this time, it made it through by a 233-189 vote, which allowed it to be included in the Military Appropriations Bill. The Senate Appropriations Committee approved the amendment by a 20-10 vote.

June 2016: Not So Fast

Resounding success, however, soon turned to bitter disappointment only one month later. On June 23, it was reported that the Veterans Equal Access Amendment had been dropped from the final version of the appropriations bill. Even though it passed the Senate and House by wide margins, a closed-door committee decided to scrap this common-sense piece of legislation that was actually supported by members of both parties.

The amendment would have forbidden the VA from punishing VA doctors who chose to talk about the benefits of medical marijuana. Not only are doctors punished, but veterans who can only afford VA health care cannot gain access to medical cannabis programs run in the states where they are legal. Instead of opening up a path to these vital programs for people who put their lives at risk for their country, this action slammed the door shut.

Rep. Earl Blumenauer, the original House sponsor of the amendment, and several other members of Congress pushed for it to be re-added to the appropriations bill. Eleven lawmakers sent a letter to legislative leaders in both the House and Senate. In the letter, the lawmakers stated that the inclusion of the amendment, which “should have been nonnegotiable,” would have provided a “life-changing benefit” to veterans.

The letter went on to state that the failure of the closed-door committee to include the amendment in the military appropriations bill would not only go against the will of both chambers of Congress, but would also be a “drastic misfortune” for vets.

However, the efforts of the lawmakers proved to be in vain. The bill was eventually passed on September 28 without the amendment.

May 2017: Hopefull Progress

In May of 2017, Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin voiced his opinion on the matter, being pro-medical marijuana for veterans during his “State of the V.A.” report. During this press release, Shulkin pointed out that there is evidence to back that beneficial uses of marijuana for veterans with ailments like PTSD. 

What’s Next?

There are several powerful organizations that agree veterans who rely on the VA for their care must be granted access to state-run medical marijuana programs. The American Legion, the largest organization of wartime vets in the country, has voiced its support for access to medical marijuana, calling for Congress to take cannabis off its list of Schedule I drugs, which are regarded by the federal government as “the most dangerous.”

A representative from the American Legion recently met with President Donald Trump’s team to outline the Legion’s main priorities when it comes to supporting veterans. At the top of the list was a push to reclassify marijuana from a Schedule I drug to a Schedule III drug. This would allow researchers easier access to quality marijuana strains so they can better study the medical benefits of the drugs. In addition, a re-classification would very likely make it easier for vets to access medicinal marijuana through the V.A.

Even the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has announced it is open to more research into the effectiveness of medical uses for marijuana. This could eventually open the door to V.A. acceptance.

With promising evolvements like these, we should see improved veteran access to medical marijuana in the coming months. Keep up to date on the latest developments in marijuana law by following our news and blog page. Simply browse through the Medical Marijuana Law page of our blog to learn more!

(Why?)

Published at Thu, 01 Jun 2017 04:00:00 +0000

How Long Does Weed Stay in Your Urine?

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How Long Does Weed Stay in Your Urine?

By Lukas W, Herb.co

How long does weed stay in your urine?

There are lots of different ways to test for traces of cannabis in a person’s system. Urine testing is by far the most common method of drug testing, especially by an employer. These samples are often collected on-site and then sent to a laboratory to be tested. THC can also be detected in hair, saliva, and blood. Since urine is the most common method of testing, how long after you smoke cannabis will THC be found in your urine?

It all depends on how much you smoke

One of the pitfalls of testing for cannabis through urine samples has to do with the exact chemical that is being tested for in the lab. The test doesn’t actually look for pure psychoactive THC, but rather the version of THC that has been processed by your body, called THC- carboxylic acid (COOH).

This leads to people testing positive for cannabis use long after they have consumed cannabis. And depending on your usage habits, it can be months after you stop and you will still test positive in your urine samples.

Fair testing

Researchers have found that everybody’s body metabolizes THC in slightly different ways. But, they still came out with a rough guide; on how the majority of people’s urine will test based on different consumption styles and timeframes.

  • Your first use will usually stay in your system for 5-8 days
  • If you use cannabis 2-4 times per week and then stop, you’ll test positive for 11-18 days
  • If you smoke 5-6 times per week, it’ll stay in your urine for 33-48 days
  • For Medical cannabis patients and people in the #smokeweedeveryday club, THC-COOH will stay in your urine for 49-63 days

For veteran smokers who have smoked for decades; they were even found with THC-COOH in their urine a whopping 77 days after stopping. That’s over two months!

These kinds of long-lasting positives can be a big problem for people who need to stop in a shorter time frame. They could have easily followed the rules of no cannabis use, but when tested, they still test positive.

The fairest tests that should be utilized worldwide is with the saliva, as THC will exit your saliva a mere 12 hours after use.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 30 May 2017 22:02:18 +0000

Nevada Legislature Approves Measure to Legalize Hemp

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Nevada Legislature Approves Measure to Legalize Hemp

Legislation that would legalize hemp throughout Nevada has been given approval by the state’s full legislature.

Senate Bill 396 received unanimous approval in the Senate late last month, and it has now been passed by the full Assembly with a 34 to 5 vote. With it being approved through both chambers, it will now be sent to Governor Brian Sandoval for consideration. Sandoval has the option of signing it into law, allowing it to become law without his signature, or vetoing it (if he does veto it the legislature could override it with a 2/3rds majority).

Senate Bill 396 would expand upon a current law that allows hemp to be grown in the state for research purposes by creating “a separate program for the growth and cultivation of industrial hemp and produce agricultural hemp seed in this State”; this would allow hemp to be grown for commercial – and not exclusively research – purposes.

The measure “requires a person who wishes to grow or handle industrial hemp or produce agricultural hemp seed to register with the Department [of Agriculture”, and “requires the testing of commodities or products made using industrial hemp by an independent testing laboratory”

The bill also “allows a facility for the production of edible marijuana products or marijuana-infused products and a medical marijuana dispensary to acquire industrial hemp from a registered grower or handler”, and “allows a facility for the production of edible marijuana products or marijuana-infused products to use industrial hemp to manufacture edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused product”.

In addition, Senate Bill 396 “allows a medical marijuana dispensary to dispense industrial hemp and edible marijuana products and marijuana-infused products containing industrial hemp”, and  “requires the Division of Public and Behavioral Health of the Department of Health and Human Services to adopt regulations setting forth minimum requirements for industrial hemp which is used by a facility for the production of edible marijuana products or marijuana-infused products to manufacture such products or which is dispensed by a medical marijuana dispensary”.

Cllick here for the full text of Senate Bill 396

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 26 May 2017 19:25:26 +0000

New Hampshire Senate Committee Votes to Establish Commission to Study Marijuana Legalization

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New Hampshire Senate Committee Votes to Establish Commission to Study Marijuana Legalization

Nevada’s Senate Judiciary Committee has voted to establish a commission designed to study the legalization of marijuana.

House Bill 215 will now move towards a vote by the full Senate. Given it has already been passed by the full House of Representatives, passage in the Senate would send it to Governor Chris Sununu for consideration.

The 22-person commission would be tasked with examining “the possible impacts of changing state policy to treat marijuana in a manner similar to the way the state deals with alcohol and shall study the legalization, regulation, and taxation of marijuana including the specific issues related to growing, selling, taxing, limiting use, advertising, promoting, and otherwise regulating marijuana and marijuana-infused edible products.”

The commission “shall also study the experiences of New Hampshire and other states regarding the use of marijuana for medical purposes and for recreational purposes”, and “shall also study the experiences of states that have or are in the process of legalizing and regulating the recreational use of marijuana by adults, with particular attention to be given to the ways the changes in marijuana laws in Maine and Massachusetts, as well as Canada, impact our state.”

In addition, the commission “shall study any other issue that the commission deems relevant to its objective”, and may “solicit the advice or testimony of any organization or individual with information or expertise relevant to its study.”

According to the proposal the members of the commission shall be as follows:

(a)  Five members of the house of representatives, appointed by the speaker of the house of representatives.

(b)  Two members of the senate, appointed by the president of the senate.

(c)  The attorney general, or designee.

(d)  The commissioner of the department of safety, or designee.

(e)  The commissioner of the department of health and human services, or designee.

(f)  The commissioner of the department of revenue administration, or designee.

(g)  The commissioner of the department of agriculture, markets, and food, or designee.

(h)  A representative of the New Hampshire Association of Chiefs of Police, appointed by that organization.

(i)  A representative of the New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union, appointed by that organization.

(j)  A representative of New Futures, appointed by that organization.

(k)  A representative of the Marijuana Policy Project, appointed by that organization.

(l)  A representative of the New Hampshire Bar Association, appointed by that organization.

(m)  A representative of the New Hampshire Medical Society, appointed by that organization.

(n)  A representative of the New Hampshire Farm Bureau Federation, appointed by that organization.

(o)  Three representatives of the public, appointed by the governor.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 26 May 2017 19:35:22 +0000